shanna: canadian, cox, pilot, polyglot.
currently in the states for university.
footie, winter soldier, anime & the like.
we'll survive by telling lies we've rationed well

historicallyaccuratesteve:

nehirose:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

i’ve reblogged this before but this one has further breakdown of exactly why, and i love it. (also hell yes, kudos to the costume department for this; it’s wrong, but it’s so clearly DELIBERATELY wrong considering how well they nailed it during the 40s sequences).

The wait-for-Steve-to-wake-up committee could have used this very handy article how to recreate a 1940s bra silhouette.

And another giveaway is that her hair is too long for regulation (and I could be wrong, but I think her shirt would be better-fitted).

cute-etsy:

Bring us the Bells poster, $25

weloveshortvideos:

You know im all about the bass, no treble.

Pointing out Marvel Studios’ lack of on-screen diversity is nowhere near a new phenomenon. As ComicsAlliance’s Andrew Wheeler has memorably pointed out, “If Marvel makes Thor 3 [as its first 2017 release], it will have made ten movies headlined by blond white men named Chris before it makes one movie headlined by someone who isn’t even white.” While not besmirching the talent or integrity of Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth and Chris Pratt, that’s taking lack of diversity to admirably comic levels.

Additionally, the studio’s lack of a movie with a female lead — specifically, a Black Widow feature starring Scarlett Johansson, although fans would also accept a Captain Marvel movie, or even a Squirrel Girl one by this point — has been commented on to such an extent that Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige recently weighed in, saying that he “very much believe[s] in doing it” in concept. “I hope we do it sooner rather than later,” he added at the time, while simultaneously pointing out that Marvel’s ongoing successful franchises make finding slots for new characters and concepts challenging.

That is somewhat of a smokescreen, in terms of excuses. As this summer’s Guardians of the Galaxy shows, Marvel has no problem introducing new characters and concepts — in fact, we’re due to have one per year for the next couple of years, with Ant-Man coming next year and Doctor Strange landing in 2016. In both of those cases, however, Marvel is sticking closely to white male leads. (Admittedly, the lead role in Doctor Strange is not cast, and it’s not impossible that Marvel will choose to break with tradition and cast a non-white male as its Sorcerer Supreme — but, given some of the actors rumored to have been considered for the role, that doesn’t look likely.)

Of course, there’s still an obvious opportunity for Marvel to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat on the subject of diversity in casting. Both Wonder Woman and Sony’s mystery Spider-Man project are scheduled (in the latter case, rumored) for 2017 release, and Marvel has an unnamed project scheduled for release May 5 of that year — almost two months before the June 23 bow for Wonder Woman. What if it snuck in a female-led movie just under the wire in order to be “first”?

Similarly, Aquaman isn’t due until July 2018, and there are three unknown Marvel projects scheduled before then. Black Panther, Falcon or even an upgrade from Netflix to theaters for Luke Cage could help Marvel become the first studio to put a superhero of color on the big screen since 2008’s Hancock — if it wanted to.

That, ultimately, is what this comes down to: what Marvel wants to do. As arguably the most successful movie studio around these days, and one that has demonstrated no problem in convincing mainstream audiences to accept a dancing tree and a talking raccoon as heroes, it’s not a question of whether Marvel could make a movie with a woman or person of color in the lead role, or even could make such a movie a hit. It’s a question of whether that’s something that the studio is interested in doing. Whenever Marvel announces its next projects — something which may be sooner than later, given this week’s Warner Bros. schedule announcement — we’ll get the answer to that question.



The Hollywood Reporter, “Warner Bros. and DC Expose Marvel’s Achilles Heel: Diversity

(via fyeahlilbit3point0)

rectumofglory:

andromedalogic:

direcartographies:

a moment of silence for all the fanfiction lost to the ravages of time, unsalvageable even by the wayback machine, condemned to its final resting place in the deactivated archives of fansites for now-syndicated television shows

rest in bytes my dear lemons and limes

redarcanacustom:

nanru:

WE ARE FIGHTING DREAMERS

gvrdigkdrjgOS:Rgkdkvksd

FIGHTING DREAMERS 

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fIGHTING DReaMERS

grigjdjvdfidn juST GO mY WAY

RIGHT HERE RIGHT NOW

cerastes we are fighting.

aluxide:

Noctis | artist: Jiyu-Kaze

coalgirls:

coalgirls:

lol

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